department of neurology  
  neurology  
  Address: The Neurological Institute of New York, 710 West 168th Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10032  
 
 
 

WHY DO I NEED A MOVEMENT DISORDERS SPECIALIST?



Many people feel that their family doctor can provide good care right in the neighborhood. They value the convenience of a local doctor who is devoted 100% to clinical care and want to receive standard care. These people are usually not interested in participating in research. Others feel that going to a neurologist who is a movement disorder specialist is important because these academic physicians are astute, experienced, compassionate and "on the cutting edge" of new treatments. Specialists are aware of all current therapies, their benefits and their side effects. These specialists coordinate the best course of treatment for each person.

Our Center's physicians teach other doctors about movement disorders and many are working at a basic science level in their basic science labs to better understand these disorders. They may be working with genetic material or cell lines in glass dishes to understand the step by step process that leads to people developing the disease they are studying. They may be conducting clinical research studies to further our knowledge of a disorder, family studies searching for a disease-causing gene or experimental drug studies to further our knowledge of specific treatments. They may be examining brain tissue from brain donor patients in order to better understand the brain cell abnormality that causes the disease.

The first and most important role of our Center's clinicians is to always provide excellent care to our patients and family members. They take a long meticulous health history and ask you to complete a written history of your health. They observe the problems you are having and put the difficulties into perspective. As they examine you, they will begin to build "a picture" of the characteristics of the movement disorder you have. They may bring in a colleague to discuss the correct diagnosis and the course of treatment if there are unusual clinical features. You may be asked to give us written permission to videotape your movement disorder as a way to precisely record the problems you are having. Often "a picture is worth a thousand words." These clinicians will spend a major part of every visit teaching you and helping you understand your movement disorder. Together they will decide with you and your family the best possible therapy. In between visits, you are encouraged to call our clinicians to ask questions and report changes. We invite people with movement disorders and their family members to explore this website in a "virtual visit" and then decide if you would benefit from our years of experience and specialty focus. Our clinicians are academic neurologists who provide clinical care, conduct research and teach their specialty here at Columbia University and around the world.

With the help of people affected with movement disorders and their families, we will continue to unravel the cause, define the genetics, describe the brain cell abnormality, develop better treatments and eventually a cure for these devastating and embarrassing disorders. We welcome your participation in your care and our research.



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Copyright © 2004 The Neurological Institute of New York || Columbia University Medical Center || Division of Movement Disorders
Affiliated with New York-Presbyterian Hospital
710 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032
Last updated: July 17, 2013
 

ABOUT US:

- MISSION STATEMENT
- OUR DOCTORS
- CONTACT & DIRECTIONS
PATIENT INFORMATION:

- OUR DOCTORS
- CLINICAL CARE
- WHAT ARE MOVEMENT DIORDERS?
- CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDIES
- CLINICAL MOTOR PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY
- MOVEMENT DISORDERS & FAMILY HISTORY
- MOVEMENT DISORDERS SURGERY CENTER
- BRAIN BANK
- CONTACT & DIRECTIONS

EDUCATION:

- MOVEMENT DISORDERS FELLOWSHIP
- FORMER AND CURRENT FELLOWS
RESEARCH:

- BASIC SCIENCE RESEARCH
- CLINICAL RESEARCH
- CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDIES
- GENETIC RESEARCH